Moog MF-108 Cluster Flux Eurorack Module

This is getting exciting now!  This  is one of my favorites from Moog.  If Moog was to only convert one of their MoogerFoogers over to the eurorack format, it should be this one.  What’s not to like?  Chorus, Flange and Vibrato driven with original bucket brigade device chips.  Multiple waveform LFO, which you can sync multiple ways, including MIDI. And feedback that sucker till you go deaf with happiness!

Moog MF-105 Midi Murf Eurorack Module

The Midi Murf has taken more time to convert over than I had originally anticipated.  There were several challenges in getting all of the control hardware to fit in a reasonable sized HP space.  Based on the effort it took I can say with confidence that I will not be converting a lot of these over!


Moog Werkstatt 01 eurorack module

Ok, yes, I have converted these before, but not in the same aesthetic of Moog’s current eurorack line. I was able shave off a few HP’s too making it smaller than the original conversion. These custom conversions are leading to somewhere right? More coming soon 😀

Original Manufacturer’s website page HERE!


Converting MoogerFooger pedals over to eurorack modules!

I was really hoping that Moog would have been putting out more eurorack modules in this last year.  Maybe this will inspire them!  Here I am converting over their MoogerFooger guitar pedals to eurorack.  Since Moog has picked a eurorack aesthetic, with the Mother 32 module, it was a ‘no brainer’ to make these follow suit. I am working on the rest of them so stay tuned for more!



Eventide Space Eurorack

Taking my favorite pedal and converting it over to euro has to be one of the more difficult tasks I have accomplished to date.  Something that is as well designed, as this Space pedal is, I had to bring all my skill sets in order to really add what I believe is the next level.  If you are familiar with this pedal then I don’t have to tell you that it is already great on its own.  But the little CV demon in me would not rest as it was always asking, “what if you could control all of those knobs with CV?”  This has been an ongoing effort for a year or more now, and I finally can say I am happy with how it has turned out!  Pricing and availability to be announced.

A DIY euro start to the new year!

I have been asked recently what I thought a good DIY starter project might be for eurorack.  There are two that come to mind that I have completed recently.  First is the BMC45 router from Barton.  This is a fun straight forward build.  Most of Barton’s eurorack DIY kits are very well thought through and as a plus are very affordable.  I added four custom mute buttons to this one as I thought that made a nice addition to live performance.  The link to that kit is here:

http://www.bartonmusicalcircuits.com/router/

bmc45

The next one is a Business Card sized Sequencer from Div 6.  Here I took two of them and stacked them into a eurorack module. Realize when you buy the kit it is just ONE sequencer. I bought two for this custom build.  This kit was very easy to build and dare I say the most ‘inexpensive sequencer you will find!’   Realize the custom euro panel I made for this was a very difficult task.  There are 122 holes in this panel and was very challenging to make.  More info can be found here on the DIY PCB kit:

http://division-6.com/products/business-card-sequencer.php

dualseq2

 

Merry Custom CV ELEVEN Xmas!

Digging deeper into CV control for Guitarists, and I am not finding too much.  So I decided on a custom CV controlled Avid Eleven would make a great Christmas gift this year.  CV input with added attenuator for each of the six parameter knobs.  If you know much about the Eleven, you know the front six knobs allow you to change the onscreen parameters.  Now you can control them with voltages from your modular synth.  I also added a CV input for the tap tempo control, so you can control the tempo with a voltage clock.   This also means you could setup six pedals and control all six knobs with pedals too, if you wanted!  DEMO VIDEO COMING SOON!
customavidelevencustomavideleven2wcustomavideleven3w

“He say you Braidrunna!”

Why is it every time I watch that movie I can’t seem to get it out of my head for days?  That background atmosphere just seems to bounce around in my skull as if I was in a constant trance. Seemed the only way to get it out of my head was to give it a go with some eurorack modules.

Modules used:

Mi Elements run through a Grendel Formant filter modulated by bubblesound uLFO. E350 Morphing Terrarium run through Korg MKP2s set on tape Echo. Speak & Read run through a ZDSP with Halls of Valhalla cart. The over all pumping sound is a MI Braids with a AD Sequencer 1 controlling pitch. The Sequencer 1 also controls pitch of e350 and the Elements.

‘SUPER’ Eurorack Modules

Continuing in the same thread of combining eurorack modules together, here are a couple more examples. First is the QCDG8. I took a 4MS QCD and expander and smashed a Circuit Abbey G8 right in between. I also added much needed bufferred mults to the outputs of the QCD and expander. This has a nice flow with all of the jacks down the middle of the panel.
QCDG8

Next is the UTILITA. Where do all of those clock outputs from the above QCDG8 go? This modules combines a Doepfer A-150, a Blue Lantern CMOS Party, 3 NE Sinclastic Empulatrix and a MI Branches. By combining them into one panel I can ‘normal’ some of the inputs making it much easier and quicker to patch.  I also solidify my workflow.  Remember ‘Familiarity’ breeds content.  The more you get used to something the more it will seem like second nature.
UTILITA

And last but not least is the COMPRESSWITCH. Here I take two Compressors from WMD and a Pittsburgh Switch and make them into one bad ass switchable compressor. This gets used in every patch I make.
COMPRESSWITCH

As you gain experience with your modular synthesizer, you will start to see you will regularly patch your modules the same way most of the time. Once you establish the workflow you use most often, it makes sense to combine modules together into ‘SUPER’ modules if you will. You will obviously have your own ideas what you would make into a SUPER module, but that is the point. You are starting to think of your modular as your custom  instrument and less like test equipment.  Don’t be afraid of learning about what is behind the panel.  It can be just as much fun as what is in front of the panel!